Investment Dispute Prevention Project

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Foreign Direct Investment (FDI) has consolidated itself as an important complementary source to boost Mexico’s economic growth. Mexico is the second FDI destiny in Latin America and receives an average of 18 billion dollars per year. Hence, it is important for our economy to give certainty to the investors. In light of this objective, Mexico is undertaking actions to strengthen the investment climate and prevent investment disputes.

To achieve this objective, the Federal Government is running a project named Investment promotion and international dispute prevention. The project is implementing coordinated public policies among our different government levels aiming to identify and solve potential conflicts before they could turn into an international dispute. 

This project is being implemented in two phases. First, the project is based on disseminating the knowledge at the different levels of government (including the municipalities) on international rules and Mexico’s Free Trade Agreements and Bilateral Investment Treaties, particularly on the investment disciplines. This knowledge is been shared through workshops where experts in investment matters explain different dispute settlement cases faced by the Mexican State and the underlying reasons. They also provide some alternative solutions and policy recommendations. This phase requires support from investment promotion agencies (ProMéxico) and a close coordination with the Secretariat of Interior.  Its implementation is well advanced. More workshops will be held this year to cover more Mexican States. Workshops have gone beyond in scope and have also covered representatives of the Congress and judicial power.  The representation offices of the Secretariat of Economy in the States are attending the workshops.  To continue informing, a periodical electronic bulletin is sent monthly in order to keep the channels of communication open with the participants to the workshops.  This phase is critical to create capacity among the public servants at all levels of government to detect a conflict before it turns out into a formal dispute.  After the relevant actors in the different levels of government are aware of the rules and the possible consequences they can help to provide information through coordination with the Federal Government particularly with the Secretariat of Economy in identifying possible disputes.  This coordination helps to address the problem before it becomes a notice of intention of an international dispute and as a prevention mechanism.

In parallel, the Secretariat of Economy is preparing more detailed information in paper and media (video). This information will be circulated among the interested States.

During the second phase, the Federal Government proposes an Agreement of Cooperation in Information Exchange to be signed between the Secretariat of the Economy and the States. The Agreement will exchange information, for example, on the current legal framework that municipalities are implementing and their consistency with international commitments. The Secretariat of Economy is in charge of the negotiation of international investment agreements and dispute settlement procedures. The Cooperation Agreements with the States will contribute to create a formal cooperation mechanism with the States to strengthen the conflict resolution before it turns out into a formal dispute.

Mexico is in process of implementing the second phase. The Secretariat of Economy is in close coordination with some States in order to follow up the signature process. These Agreements will help the Federal Government to receive cooperation in terms of information exchange and transparency.  The legal instrument is not aiming at creating a binding legal consequence for those local governments that are not able to provide the information but to act as a “bona fide” instrument to support cooperation and information exchange. The expectation is to contribute to the creation of a positive environment for investments from the local to the Federal Governments. The mechanism for resolving issues previous to the presentation of the “notice” is based also on a serial of meetings with high level authorities when the State or the Municipalities are involved in the problem and identify possible solutions or constructive discussions.

The overall project is being coordinated by the Secretariat of Economy and it is supported by the General Secretariat of the Organization of American States (OAS).  The results are publicly available in the website of the Secretariat of Economy and ProMéxico. The website informs the state of play of the Agreements signed by the States. This site helps the States to publicize its status as a “safe destination” for investments. This second phase is still in an early stage of implementation.

The outcomes are being monitored by the OAS Secretariat as a pilot project.

Home Trade and Investment

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Tariff Information System via Internet

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The Tariff Information System via Internet (SIAVI) version 4 presents new features and advantages, and substitutes SIAVI 2 and 3. SIAVI 4 displays in a single system, sets of foreign trade statistics from 2003 to 2011, providing statistical data grouped into 2, 4, 6 and 8-digit HS.

With this new version of the SIAVI, the user is able to link directly to the Integrated Foreign Trade Information System (SIICEX), as well as to ProMéxico's Exportanet; ProMéxico's Exporters Directory (DIEX)  and to the Secretariat of Economy's Mexican Business Information System (SIEM).

Similarly, SIAVI 4 provides links to Internet pages where our main trade partners publish their tariff and/or statistical information.

Click here to go to the SIAVI (Information available only in Spanish)



 

Forms

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Forms for completion for procedures with the RNIE

Information only available in Spanish

First Section: Foreign individuals or legal entities Second Section: Mexican companies with foreign investment Third Section: Trusts from which rights are derived in favor of foreign investment

Registration

 


Registration

 


Registration

 


Amendment notices

 


Amendment notices


 


Amendment notices

 


Quarterly Report 

Quarterly Report

 
 

Annual Renewal (Economic)
 

Annual Renewal (Economic)

 
 

Cancellation

Cancellation

 

Cancellation

 

 

Other procedure forms
Public Notary Form

 

About the RNIE

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What is the RNIE?
 

The National Register of Foreign Investment (Registro Nacional de Inversiones Extranjeras, RNIE) is the area of Federal Government responsible for the accounting and tracking of foreign investment flows in our country.

When was the RNIE created?
 

 

The RNIE was created in March 1973, with the publication of the Law to Promote Mexican Investment and Regulate Foreign Investment. The goal was for the Mexican Government to monitor compliance with the provisions on foreign investment and have a source of information which showed the behavior of foreign investment in the country. The aforementioned Law, was abrogated in December 1993 with the publication of the Foreign Investment Law, reformed by Decrees published on May 12th 1995, June 7th 1995, December 24th 1996, January 23rd 1998, January 19th 1999 and June 4th 2001.

 

Although the Law to Promote Mexican Investment and Regulate Foreign Investment was repealed, the purposes for which it was created continue to be recognized in the current Foreign Investment Law.

 

How is the RNIE structured? 
 

 

For organization and functioning, the RNIE is divided into three sections:
 

First Section: Foreign individuals and legal entities.
 

Second Section: Companies.
 

Third Section: Trusts.
 

This structure is grounded on Article 31 of the Foreign Investment Law and Article 31 of the Regulations of the Foreign Investment Law and the National Register of Foreign Investment. 

 

What procedures should be done with the RNIE?
 

 

a) Registration application

b) Notification of amendments to information previously provided to the RNIE

c) Quarterly income and expenditure reports

d) Submission of an Annual Economic Report

e) Application to cancel registration

f) Notices from public notaries

 

Where is the RNIE?
 

In order to provide a flexible, timely service to individuals, the Mexican Government has decentralized the RNIE's activities in dealing with procedures, so that paperwork can be submitted:
 

In any of the Secretariat of Economy's 51 Federal Delegations and Subdelegations in different states and municipalities of the Mexican Republic; or in the Directorate General of Foreign Investment, situated at Insurgentes Sur N° 1940, piso 8, Col. Florida, CP 01030, Mexico, DF, Tel. 52-29-61-00, Ext. 33431, 33410, 33400, 33403, 33422, 33419, 33423, 33424, 33409, 33439, 33428. Documentation can be send to the Federal Agencies or to the Directorate General of Foreign Investment by fax, certified mail or private courier, with return receipt where applicable. The official response or ruling will be returned by the same means, providing a payment receipt for the services requested was attached to the documentation.

 

How long will it take for the RNIE to respond?
 

The RNIE will respond in no more than 20 working days counting from the day following submission of the documentation. After this time, if no ruling is issued on the procedure requested, it shall be taken that the form was not properly completed.

 

Multilateral Organisms

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Mexico's participation in global markets has been advanced by the strategic link with other high growth countries and regions. In addition to its many trade agreements, Mexico plays an active role in multilateral trade negotiations within the World Trade Organization (WTO), the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD), the Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation Forum (APEC) and the Latin American Integration Association (ALADI).


Organización para la Cooperación y Desarrollo Económico  OMC APEC ALADI

Tariff and Statistical Information

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In this section you will find information of the indicators which summarize Mexico's foreign trade operations by main countries, agreements and treaties, and by tariff codes.

Trade Balance

By main partner countries
By main partner countries Import Export
Accumulated Jan-Dec from 1993 to 2011

PDF/ Excel

PDF/ Excel
Annual from 1993 to December 2011  PDF/ Excel PDF/ Excel

By Free Trade Agreements and Treaties and sectors
By Free Trade Agreements and Treaties and sectors
2009

2010

2011
Year prior to entry into effect of the FTAS vs 2009, 2010      
Total  PDF/ Excel PDF/ Excel PDF / Excel
Oil Sector PDF/ Excel PDF/ Excel PDF / Excel
Non-Oil Sector PDF/ Excel PDF/ Excel PDF / Excel
Agrifood Sector PDF/ Excel PDF/ Excel PDF / Excel
Agriculture Sector PDF/ Excel PDF/ Excel PDF / Excel
Agroindustrial Sector PDF/ Excel PDF/ Excel PDF / Excel
Fishing Sector PDF/ Excel PDF/ Excel PDF / Excel
Industrial Sector PDF/ Excel PDF/ Excel PDF / Excel

Accumulated Jan-Dec year prior to entry into effect of the FTAs vs the same period of 2012
Accumulated Jan-Dec year prior to entry into effect of the FTAs vs the same period of 2012
2012
Total  PDF/ Excel
Oil Sector PDF/ Excel
Non-Oil Sector PDF/ Excel
Agrifood Sector PDF/ Excel
Agriculture Sector PDF/ Excel
Agroindustrial Sector PDF/ Excel
Fishing Sector PDF/ Excel
Industrial Sector PDF/ Excel


Statistical and Tariff Information Inquiry System

This system provides the figures by country for ANNUAL, MONTHLY AND MAIN PRODUCTS imported and exported.

 


MEXICO FOREIGN TRADE INQUIRY SYSTEM
 
The information provided in this system refers to Mexico's trade exchange by country of destination and country of origin, as well as at tariff code level.

Select the Country
 
 
Inquiry Options:
 

Monthly Trade Balance

 


Source: BANXICO  
Send  

 

Tariff Information System via Internet (SIAVI 4)

 

Click here to go to SIAVI.
 

Integrated Foreign Trade Information System (SIICEX)

Standards and TARIFF information applied to imports by Mexico.

 

SE Agencies Abroad

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The Secretariat of Economy has seven agencies abroad which contribute to establish Mexico as an export power and an investment destination at a global level.

To that end, it drives Mexico's economic integration into the strategic economic blocks around the world, in order to raise the country's competitiveness.

These agencies offer services and programs for business people and entrepreneurs around the globe and contribute to the diffusion and use of the network of 12 Free Trade Agreements (FTAs) with 44 countries, 28 Reciprocal Investment Promotion and Protection Agreements (RIPPAs) and 9 Trade Agreements (Economic Complementation Agreements and Partial Scope Agreements) within the framework of the Latin American Integration Association (ALADI).

 

Integral Foreign Trade Information System (Siicex)

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SIICEX

The Siicex web site is intended to offer organizations, businesses, importers, exporters, government, students and citizens, information related to foreign trade from a single enquiry point, enabling them to reduce transaction costs by facilitating information searches and providing certainty about their obligations in acts of Foreign Trade.

Its purpose is to present the regulations which establish the general provisions within the scope of competence of the Secretariat, and the criteria for compliance with laws, international trade agreements or treaties, decrees, regulations and other regulatory systems, grouping them, so users can apply them easily.

The system comprises five sections: Siiceteca (Virtual Library); Tariff; Foreign Trade Bulletin, Today; Did you know…? and This Month, which together seek to give users easy access to information related to foreign trade.

Foreign Trade in Figures

The Tariff Information System via Internet contains up to date trade statistics, with monthly trade data from 2007.

Siiceteca

It is a virtual library containing information on legal instruments pertaining to foreign trade in different versions (original text, amendments and integrated text), and related publications, and the procedures and forms which apply for each system.

The virtual library is made up of six modules: Laws and Regulations; Trade Treaties and Agreements; Decrees; Quotas; Permits and Miscellaneous Regulations, and Foreign Trade Rules.
 

Siiceteca Modules

1. Laws and Regulations. This module gives access to the different laws and regulations governing foreign trade such as the Foreign Trade Law; the Customs Law; the General Import and Export Tax Law, etc.

2. Trade Treaties and Agreements. This module shows the various decrees on free trade treaties signed by Mexico, which are: North America (USA/Canada), Costa Rica, G2 (Colombia), Nicaragua, Chile, European Union, Israel, Northern Triangle (El Salvador/Guatemala/Honduras), European Association (Norway/Iceland/Liechtenstein/Switzerland), Uruguay and Japan; and also the Decrees on  Economic Complementation Agreements signed by Mexico such as the ECA  6 (Argentina), ECA  8 (Peru), ECA  51 (Cuba), ECA  53 (Brazil), ECA  54 and 55 (Argentina, Brazil, Paraguay and Uruguay). The module also shows the tariffs (decrees concerning applicable rates), customs rulings and mentions the partial scope agreements, which are: Ecuador, Paraguay and Panama.

3. Decrees. The module is made up of the various decrees regarding development programs such as IMMEX, PROSEC, ECEX, ALTEX and Drawback published in the Official Gazette of the Federation, as well as TIGIE Tariffs, FTA and Border Tariff Rates, Competitiveness of the Automotive Industry, Vehicle Importation and Border Vehicles (businesses and residents).

4. Quotas: This module includes the quota agreements derived from trade treaties and agreements (FTAs, ECAs, ALADI, WTO) and unilateral agreements.

The module is divided into three parts: America: (North America (US/Canada), Colombia, Costa Rica, Nicaragua, Northern Triangle (El Salvador/Guatemala/Honduras), Uruguay, ALADI, ECA  53 (Brazil), ECA  55 (Mercosur), ECA  6 (Argentina) and remaining quotas; Europe and Asia: European Union, European Association (Norway/Iceland/Liechtenstein/Switzerland), Israel and Japan, and Others: (WTO, Unilateral and Federal Income Law (Tenth Transitory Provisions)).

5. Permits and Miscellaneous Regulations: This module includes the SE's agreements on non-tariff regulations such as: TIGIE 2002-2007 Miscellaneous Provisions and Correlation Tables, Permits, Official Mexican Standards (NOMs), Countervailing Duties, IMMEX (PITEX/Maquila), Automotive, National Content and Regulatory Quality as well as those of other agencies: Commission for the Control of the Production and Use of Pesticides, Fertilizers, and Toxic Substances (Cicoplafest), and the Secretariats of Agriculture, Livestock, Rural Development, Fisheries and Food (SAGARPA), National Defense (SEDENA), Environment and Natural Resources (SEMARNAT), Energy (SENER), Education (SEP), and Health (SSA).

6. Foreign Trade Rules. This module includes the amendments and annexes of the General Rules and Criteria on Foreign Trade, issued by the Secretariat of Economy, and also includes the General Rules on Foreign Trade of the SAT, issued by the Tax Administration Service (SAT).
 

Tariff

This section is the result of a joint effort by the Secretariat of Economy and the Mexican Confederation of Associations of Customs Brokers (CAAAREM), to streamline the activities of the different stakeholders in foreign trade.

The section provides information on the current tariff rates of the General Import and Export Tax, including FTA and Prosec tariffs, of non-tariff regulations and general observations.
 

Foreign Trade Bulletin, Today

This electronic bulletin represents the efforts of the Secretariat of Economy to diffuse, periodically, topics of interest and relevant news on foreign trade, such as Official Provisions (amendments and publications of decrees, agreements, rulings, etc.).
 

Did you know...?

Presents current issues, statistics, brief and relevant news, tips on foreign trade and frequently asked questions on topics such as Trade Facilitation, Program Transparency and Foreign Trade Instruments.
 

This Month

Contains a set of official provisions on foreign trade which are published in the Official Gazette of the Federation (DOF) by the agencies and entities of the Federal Public Administration during a calendar month, such as: agreements, rulings, manuals, annexes, decrees, clarifications, decisions, rules and notices.
 

Responsible for the Information

The Director General for Foreign Trade is responsible for the information published on SIICEX.
 

Legal Basis

Rule 4.1 of Title 4 of the Agreement through which the Secretariat of Economy issues the General Rules and Criteria on Foreign Trade, dated July 6th, 2007.

Visit the SIICEX microsite at www.siicex.gob.mx (Information available only in Spanish)

International Trade Negotiations

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Mexico has a network of 10 FTAs with 45 countries, 30 Reciprocal Investment Promotion and Protection Agreements (RIPPAs) and 9 trade agreements (Economic Complementation and Partial Scope Agreements) within the framework of the Latin American Integration Association (ALADI).

In addition, Mexico is an active participant in multilateral and regional organisms and forums such as the World Trade Organization (WTO), the Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation (APEC), the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) and the ALADI. 

NAFTHA North America
Agreements Latin America
Agreements Asia Pacific
Agreements Europe
 

Additional information


 

Europe

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Agreements Europe
 

European Union

Information only available in Spanish

Economic Partnership Agreement

Economic Partnership Agreement

Decree_Economic_PartnershipAgreement_CoordinationPolicy_1
Decree_Economic_PartnershipAgreement_CoordinationPolicy_2
Decree_Economic_PartnershipAgreement_CoordinationPolicy_3
Decree_Economic_PartnershipAgreement_CoordinationPolicy_4
Decree_Economic_PartnershipAgreement_CoordinationPolicy_5
Decree_Economic_PartnershipAgreement_CoordinationPolicy_6
Decree_Economic_PartnershipAgreement_CoordinationPolicy_7
Decree_Economic_PartnershipAgreement_CoordinationPolicy_8
Decree_Economic_PartnershipAgreement_CoordinationPolicy_9
Mexico-European Union Council Decisions

Mexico-European Union Council Decisions

Decision 1. Year 2000
Decision 2. Year 2000
Decision 1. Year 2001
Decision 1. Year 2002
Decision 2. Year 2002
Decision 3. Year 2002
Decision 4. Year 2002
Decision 5. Year 2002
Decision 1. Year 2004
Decision 2. Year 2004
Decision 3. Year 2004
Decision 4. Year 2004
Decision 5. Year 2004
Decision 1. Year 2005
Decision 1. Year 2008
Decision 2. Year 2008
Decision 3. Year 2008
Decision 1. Year 2010
Agreement between Mexico and the EU on Spirit Drinks

Agreement between Mexico and the EU on Spirit Drinks

EC Agreement
Spirit Drinks Decision
Mexico-European Union Joint Executive

Mexico-European Union Joint Executive Plan

Mexico-European Union Joint Executive Plan
Joint Communiqués

Joint Communiqués

Joint Council 9/Feb/12 Joint Communiqué

European Free Trade Association

Free Trade Agreement Mexico-EFTA

European Free Trade Association

Promulgating Decree of the FTA Mexico - EFTA 1st part
Promulgating Decree of the FTA Mexico - EFTA 2nd part
Promulgating Decree of the FTA Mexico - EFTA 3rd part
Promulgating Decree of the FTA Mexico - EFTA 4th part
Promulgating Decree of the FTA Mexico - EFTA 5th part
TIGIE Decree from July 1 to December 31 2001 EFTA
Mexico-EFTA Joint Committee Decisions

Mexico-EFTA Joint Committee Decisions

Explanatory Notes 2001
Decision 1-2002
Decision 1-2008
Decision 2-2002
Decision 3-2002
Rules of Origin Certification Agreement 2001
Rules of Origin Certification Agreement 2002
Agriculture Agreements

Agriculture Agreements

Mexico-Iceland Agriculture Agreement
Mexico-Norway Agriculture Agreement
Mexico-Switzerland Agriculture Agreement

Bilateral Cooperation and Agreements

Bilateral Cooperation and Agreements

Bilateral Cooperation and Agreements

Mexico-Belarus Agreement
Mexico-Czech Republic Agreement
Mexico-Rumania Agreement
Mexico-Turkey Agreement
Mexico-Ukraine Agreement
Mexico-Portugal Memorandum of Understanding
Mexico-Slovak Republic Memorandum of Understanding
Mexico-Switzerland Memorandum of Understanding
PROFTAUEM

Dissemination Material

Country Factsheet

Country factsheet

Albania-Factsheet
Germany-Factsheet
EFTA-Factsheet
Andorra-Factsheet
Austria-Factsheet
Belarus-Factsheet
Belgium-Factsheet
Bosnia-Factsheet
Bulgaria-Factsheet
Cyprus-Factsheet
Denmark-Factsheet
Slovakia-Factsheet
Slovenia-Factsheet
Spain-Factsheet
Estonia-Factsheet
France-Factsheet
Finland-Factsheet
Georgia-Factsheet
Hungary-Factsheet
Ireland-Factsheet
Iceland-Factsheet
Italy-Factsheet
Latvia-Factsheet
Liechtenstein.Factsheet
Lithuania-Factsheet
Luxembourg-Factsheet
Malta-Factsheet
Macedonia-Factsheet
Moldavia-Factsheet
Monaco-Factsheet
Norway-Factsheet
Netherlands-Factsheet
Poland-Factsheet
Portugal-Factsheet
United Kingdom-Factsheet
Czech Republic-Factsheet
Romania-Factsheet
Russia-Factsheet
San Marino-Factsheet
Sweden-Factsheet
Switzerland-Factsheet
Turkey-Factsheet
Ukraine-Factsheet
European Union-Factsheet

Latin America

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Agreements Latin America

Bilateral Initiatives

Information only available in Spanish

Argentina

Argentina

Agreement which presents the full texts of the Twelfth Additional Protocol and the Fourteenth Additional Protocol to Economic Complementation Agreement No 6
Report on the Trade and Investment Relations between Mexico and Argentina
Factsheet
Belice
 
Factsheet
Bolivia

Bolivia

Partial Scope Agreement No 66 (PSA 66)
Agreement which presents the preferential tariffs of ECA 66
Report on the Trade and Investment Relations of Bolivia
Factsheet
Brazil

Brasil

Economic Complementation Agreement No 53 between Mexico and Brazil (ECA 53)
First Additional Protocol to ECA 53
Second Additional Protocol to ECA 53
Third Additional Protocol to ECA 53
Report on the Trade and Investment Relationship between Mexico and Brazil
Factsheet
Colombia

Colombia

Free Trade Agreement between Mexico, Colombia and Venezuela
Mexico's Tariff Reduction Schedule
Colombia's Tariff Reduction Schedule
Report on the Trade and Investment Relationship between Mexico and Colombia
Decree which determines that the FTA between Mexico, Colombia and Venezuela, is without effect between Mexico and Venezuela
Agreement announcing the applicable rate of General Import Tax for goods originating from Colombia
Agreement announcing the applicable rate of General Import Tax for goods originating from the Republic of Colombia
Decree of the Protocol amending the FTA between Mexico, Colombia and Venezuela
Resolution amending the miscellaneous provisions establishing the general rules on the application of the customs-related provisions of the FTA between Mexico, Colombia and Venezuela
Decree announcing the Protocol amending the FTA between Mexico, Colombia and Venezuela
Decree which repeals the miscellaneous provision establishing the rate applicable from November 19, 2006 of the General Import Tax on merchandise originating from Colombia
Agreement which states the applicable rate of General Import Tax for goods originating from Colombia
Decision 1
Decision 2
Decision 3
Decision 4
Decision 5
Decision 6
Decision 7
Decision 8
Decision 9
Decision 10
Decision 11
Decision 12
Decision 13
Decision 14
Decision 15
Decision 16
Decision 17
Decision 18
Decision 19
Decision 20
Decision 21 
Decision 22
Decision 23
Decision 24
Decision 25
Decision 26
Decision 27
Decision 28
Decision 29
Decision 30
Decision 31
Decision 32
Decision 33
Decision 35
Decision 36
Decision 37
Decision 38
Decision 39
Decision 40
Decision 41
Decision 42
Decision 43
Decision 44
Decision 45
Decision 46
Decision 47
Decision 48
Decision 49
Decision 50
Decision 51
Decision 52
Decision 53
Decision 54
Decision 55
Decision 56
Decision 62
Report on the Trade and Investment Relationship between Mexico and Colombia
Factsheet
Costa Rica

Costa Rica

Free Trade Agreement between Mexico and Costa Rica
Report on the Trade and Investment Relationship between Mexico and Costa Rica
Factsheet
Decision 1
Decision 2
Decision 3
Decision 4
Decision 5
Decision 6
Decision 7
Decision 8
Decision 9
Decision 10
Decision 11
Decision 12
Decision 13
ecision 14
Decision 15
Decision 16
Decision 17
Decision 18
Decision 19
Decision 20
Decision 21
Decision 22
Decision 23
Cuba

Cuba

Economic Complementation Agreement No 51 between Mexico and Cuba (ECA 51)
First Additional Protocol to ECA 51
Second Additional Protocol to ECA 51
Report on the Trade and Investment Relationship between Mexico and Cuba
Factsheet
Chile

Chile

Free Trade Agreement between Mexico and Chile. First Part
Free Trade Agreement between Mexico and Chile. Second Part
Certificate of Origin form
Decision No.1
Decision No.1.1
Decision No. 2
Decision No. 3
Decision No. 4
Decision No. 5
Factsheet
Ecuador

Ecuador

Partial Scope Agreement No 29 between Mexico and Ecuador (PSA 29)
Decree for the Application of PSA 29
Report on the Trade and Investment Relationship between Mexico and Ecuador
Factsheet
El Salvador

El Salvador

Free Trade Agreement between Mexico, El Salvador, Guatemala and Honduras
Factsheet
Guatemala

Guatemala

Free Trade Agreement between Mexico, El Salvador, Guatemala and Honduras
Factsheet
Honduras

Honduras

Free Trade Agreement between Mexico, El Salvador, Guatemala and Honduras
Report on the Trade and Investment Relationship between Mexico and Honduras
Factsheet
Nicaragua

Nicaragua

Free Trade Agreement between Mexico and Nicaragua
Tariff Reduction Program of the FTA between Mexico and Nicaragua. Mexico List
Factsheet
Panama

Panama

Report on the Trade and Investment Relationship between Mexico and Panama
Factsheet
Paraguay
Paraguay
Partial Scope Agreement No 38 between Mexico and Paraguay (PSA 38)
Report on the Trade and Investment Relationship between Mexico and Paraguay
Factsheet
Peru

Trade integration Agreement Mexico-Peru

Preamble
Chapter I.        Initial Provisions
Chapter II.       General Definitions
Chapter III.      Market Access
            Annex to Articles 3.3 and 3.6
            Annex to Article 3.4-A
                                  General Notes
                     Mexico List
                     Peru List
            Annex to Article 3.4-B
            Annex to Article 3.9
Chapter IV.       Rules of Origin and Origin-Related Procedures
            Annex to Article 4.2
Chapter V.        Mutual Recognition of Denominations of Origin
Chapter VI.       Safe Harbor Clauses
Chapter VII.      Sanitary and Phytosanitary Measures
Chapter VIII.     Technical Obstacles to Trade
Chapter IX.       Unfair Practices
Chapter X.        Cross-Border Service Trade
Chapter XI.       Investment
Chapter XII.      Financial Services
Chapter XIII.     Entry and Temporary Stay of Business People
Chapter XIV.     Mutual Recognition of Study Certificates, Academic Titles and/or Degrees
           Annex I Non-Conforming Measures
                     Interpretative Note
                           Mexico List
                           Peru List
           Annex II Future Measures
           Interpretative Note
                           Mexico List
                           Peru List
            Annex III Market Access
                           Interpretative Note
                           Mexico List
                           Peru List
            Annex IV Exceptions to Most-Favored Nation Treatment
            Annex V Activities Reserved to the State
            Annex VI Financial Services
                           Interpretative Note
                           Mexico List
                           Peru List
Chapter XV.       Dispute Settlement
Chapter XVI.      Transparency
Chapter XVII.     Agreement Administration
Chapter XVIII.    Exceptions
Chapter XIX.      Final Provisions
Country factsheet
Factsheet
Uruguay

Uruguay

Report on the Trade and Investment Relationship between Mexico and Uruguay
Free Trade Agreement between Mexico and Uruguay
Factsheet

Mercosur

Economic Complementation Agreement No 54 (ECA 54)

Economic Complementation Agreement No 54 (ECA 54)

Economic Complementation Agreement No 54 (ECA 54)
Economic Complementation Agreement No 55 (ECA 55)

Economic Complementation Agreement No 55 (ECA 55)

Agreement:
Economic Complementation Agreement No 55 between Mexico and Mercosur (ECA 55)
Agreement on the coming into effect of ECA 55
First Additional Protocol to ECA 55
Notice of the coming into effect of the First Additional Protocol to ECA 55
Notice of the coming into effect of ECA 55between Mexico and Paraguay
Second Additional Protocol to ECA 55
Notice of the coming into effect of the First Additional Protocol to ECA 55 between Mexico and Brazil
Notice of the coming into effect of the First Additional Protocol to ECA 55 between Mexico and Argentina
Decree repealing Appendices I, II and IV of ECA 55
Third and Fourth Additional Protocols to ECA 55
Notice of the coming into effect of the Third and Fourth Additional Protocols to ECA 55 between Mexico and Argentina
Appendix I
Decree for the application of Appendix I of ECA 55
First Additional Protocol to Appendix I of ECA 55
Decree for the application of the First Additional Protocol to Appendix I of ECA 55
Amending Decree for the application of the First Additional Protocol to Appendix I of ECA 55
Second Additional Protocol to Appendix I of ECA 55
Decree for application of the Second Additional Protocol to Appendix I of ECA 55
Decree for application of Appendix I of ECA 55
Amendment to the Second Additional Protocol to Appendix I of ECA 55
Amending Decree for the application of Appendix I of ECA 55
Third Additional Protocol to Appendix I of ECA 55
Decree for application of the Third Additional Protocol to Appendix I of ECA 55
Agreement stating the preferential tariffs of Appendix I of ECA 55

Appendix II

Decree for application of Appendix II of ECA 55
First Additional Protocol to Appendix II of ECA 55
Decree for application of Appendix II of ECA 55
Second Additional Protocol to Appendix II of ECA 55
Decree for application of the Second Additional Protocol to Appendix II of ECA 55
Amending agreement of the Second Additional Protocol to Appendix II of ECA 55
Amending Decree for application of the Second Additional Protocol to Appendix II of ECA 55
Agreement stating the preferential tariffs of Appendix II of ECA 55cuerdo que da a conocer las preferencias arancelarias del Apéndice II del ACE 55
Third Additional Protocol to Appendix II of ECA 55

Appendix III  NOT NEGOTIATED

Appendix IV
First Additional Protocol to Appendix IV of ECA 55
Decree for application of Appendix IV of ECA 55
Second Additional Protocol to Appendix IV of ECA 55
Third Additional Protocol to Appendix IV of ECA 55
Agreement stating the preferential tariffs of Appendix IV of ECA 55

Regional Initiatives

Latin American Pacific Alliance

Latin American Pacific Alliance

Mérida Declaration
Lima Declaration
Paranal, Chile Declaration
Latin American Pacific Basin

Latin American Pacific Basin

Urubamba Ministerial Declaration
Puerto Vallarta Ministerial Declaration
Santiago Ministerial Declaration
Cancún Ministerial Declaration
Lima Ministerial Declaration
Santiago de Cali Ministerial Declaration
Free Trade Agreement with Central America

Free Trade Agreement with Central America

Factsheet
Preamble
Index
I. Initial Provisions
II. General Definitions
III. National Treatment and Market Access for Goods
            Annex 3.4 Tariff Treatment Program
IV. Rules of Origin
          IV. Annex 4.3 Specific Rules of Origin
V. Customs Procedures Related to the Origin of Goods
VI. Trade Facilitation
VII. Trade Defense
VIII. Sanitary and Phytosanitary Measures
IX. Technical Obstacles to Trade
X. Public Contracting
XI. Investment
          XI-XII. Annex I Non-Conforming Measures - Costa Rica List
          XI-XII. Annex I Non-Conforming Measures - El Salvador List
          XI-XII. Annex I Non-Conforming Measures - Guatemala List
          XI-XII. Annex I Non-Conforming Measures - Honduras List
          XI-XII. Annex I Non-Conforming Measures - Mexico List
          XI-XII. Annex I Non-Conforming Measures - Nicaragua List
          XI-XII. Annex I Non-Conforming Measures - Explanatory Notes
          XI-XII. Annex II Future Measures - Costa Rica List
          XI-XII. Annex II Future Measures - El Salvador List
          XI-XII. Annex II Future Measures - Guatemala List
          XI-XII. Annex II Future Measures - Honduras List
          XI-XII. Annex II Future Measures - Mexico List
          XI-XII. Annex II Future Measures - Nicaragua List
          XI-XII. Annex II Future Measures - Explanatory Notes
          XI-XII. Annex III Activities Reserved to the State - Costa Rica List
          XI-XII. Annex III Activities Reserved to the State - El Salvador List
          XI-XII. Annex III Activities Reserved to the State - Guatemala List
          XI-XII. Annex III Activities Reserved to the State - Honduras List
          
          XI-XII. Annex III Activities Reserved to the State - Nicaragua List
          XI-XII. Annex III Activities Reserved to the State - Explanatory Notes
XII. Cross-Border Service Trade
XIII. Telecommunications Services
XIV. Temporary Entry of Business People
XV. Electronic Trade
XVI. Intellectual Property
XVII. Dispute Settlement
XVIII. Transparency
XIX. Treaty Administration
XX. Exceptions
XXI. Final Provisions

Asia Pacific

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Agreements Asia-Pacific


Information only available in Spanish

Australia
 
Investment Promotion and Protection Agreement
Factsheet
Korea
 
Investment Promotion and Protection Agreement
Factsheet
China
 
Investment Promotion and Protection Agreement
Factsheet
India
 
Investment Promotion and Protection Agreement
Factsheet
Israel
 
FTA Summary
Free Trade Agreement Mexico-Israel. First Section
Free Trade Agreement Mexico-Israel. Second Section
Tariff Rules
Certification-Israel
Factsheet
Japan
 
Factsheet
Full agreement
Agreement text
Amending Protocol 2011 (Spa)
Amending Protocol 2011 (Eng)
Mexico-Japan
Access Protocol
EPA Evaluation
Implementation Agreement
Annex1-sec1
Annex1-sec2-1
Annex1-sec3-1
Annex1-sec3-2
Annex-02 Mexico Measurements
Annex-03 Spirit Drinks
Annex-04 Specific Rules of Origin
Annex-05 Verifications of Origin
Annex-06 Existing Reserve Measurements
Annex-07 Future Reserve Measurements
Annex-08 Activities Reserved to the State
Annex-09 Exceptions to the Most-Favored Nation Treatment
Annex-10 Categories of Entry and Temporary Stays of Nationals for Business Purposes
Annex-11 Entities
Annex-12 Goods
Annex-13 Services
Annex-14 Construction Services
Annex-15 Thresholds
Annex-16 Mexico General Notes
Annex-17 Publications
Annex-18 Purchasing Procedures
Decision-1
Decision-2
Decision-3
Decision-4
Decision-5
Decision-6
Decision-7
Factsheet
Singapore
 
Investment Promotion and Protection Agreement
Factsheet
Trans-Pacific Strategic Economic Partnership Agreement (TPP)
 
1.- APEC Leaders Communiqué
2.- TPP Meeting Secretary Ferrari with CEC
3.- Start TPP Consultations
4.- Asia Tour Close
5.- Washington D.C. Visit Close
6.- Oceania Tour Close Gira
7.- Let Mexico in on trade agreement. op ed. Secertario Bruno Ferrari
Factsheet

Initiative for Strengthening Competition and Regulatory Reform for Competitiveness

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What is the Objective?

To improve Mexico's competitiveness through the reform and amendment of the regulatory and institutional framework, and improve the business environment by facilitating the opening, operation and growth of its businesses. In addition, this initiative generates proposals to promote Mexico's development by boosting productivity, economic growth and the generation of better quality products and services at better prices.
 
What does the OECD do for Mexico?

The OECD has provided Mexico with recommendations, strategies, advice and the construction of capacities based on international best practices. The OECD's contributions have taken the form of notes, executive presentations, detailed reports, courses, work documents and formal OECD publications.
 
Who is Involved?

The initiative is coordinated by the Undersecretary of Competitiveness and Standardization of the Secretariat of Economy and involves OECD specialists on regulatory policy and competitiveness policy, the Federal Commission on Regulatory Reform (COFEMER) and the Federal Competitiveness Commission (CFC).

 

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